Book Of The Week

Book Of The Week: Hagstone by Sinéad Gleeson

Sinéad Gleeson has forged a career that has, among other things, become largely devoted to supportin...

Book Of The Week: Quickly, While They Still Have Horses by Jan Carson

In 1973, Gabriel García Márquez told The Atlantic: "In Mexico, surrealism runs through the streets… ...

In Knife, Salman Rushdie confronts a world where liberal principles like free speech are old-fashioned

Knife is Salman Rushdie's account of how he narrowly survived an attempt on his life in August 2022,...

Book Of The Week: Habitat by Catriona Shine

It’s a wonderful oddity when a debut novel is truly uncategorisable, trailblazing with no comparison...

Book Of The Week: You Are Here by David Nicholls

Coming soon after the release of the Netflix version of One Day, David Nicholls' latest novel is ano...

Book Of The Week: International Booker Kairos by Jenny Erpenbeck

German writer Jenny Erpenbeck and translator Michael Hofmann have won the International Booker Prize...

Book Of The Week: The Alternatives by Caoilinn Hughes

Profoundly moving in its delicacy, Caoilinn Hughes's The Alternatives is a portrait of four brillian...

Book Of The Week: Openings by Lucy Caldwell

The Carver-esque story titles that make up Lucy Caldwell's new collection belie the lyricism at work...

Book Of The Week: Land Is All That Matters by Myles Dungan

He also – importantly – makes use of the National Folklore Collection, "a vital reservoir of myth as...

Book Of The Week: Old Romantics by Maggie Armstrong

You only have to nip into any bookshop to become aware of the overwhelming rise in romance fiction. ...

Book Of The Week: Devotion by Mícheál McCann

One of the most frustrating things about contemporary attitudes to the Confessional lyric is the exp...